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Signia hearing aids deliver the sound that nature intended

The latest generation of Signia hearing aids with direct audio streaming from iPhone and TV improve your hearing experience to a remarkable new level and preserve the familiar sound of your own voice – thanks to the world's first Own Voice Processing (OVP).

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Connectivity in the palm of your hands

Everyday activities like listening to music and making phone calls assume a new challenge when hearing loss sets in, but modern hearing aids master these tasks with ease.

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Effortless hearing through wind and echoes

Following our previous blogpost about how hearing aids help you tackle challenging listening environments with ease, we cover more high tech features that address specific situations like gusts of wind and echoes.

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Protect what’s precious

Over the next few weeks, we will cover the many ways in which Signia hearing aids and their clever technology help people who are hard of hearing. We start with a general overview.

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The wonder of hearing

The human ear is a highly skilled organ allowing us to enjoy life’s brilliant sounds. Take a look at how the ear supports us in navigating the world safely.

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2006: The year that hearing aids began to "learn"

The revolutionary Centra hearing aids were the first anywhere in the world to be able to actively learn additional information regarding their settings based purely on the personal preferences of each user in a wide variety of situations.

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2004: Acuris. Hearing aids that can communicate

With Acuris hearing aids, both sides constantly exchanged large volumes of data and adjusted to any hearing situation, in sync with each other.

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1997: Prisma. A computer for the ear

A new era in hearing aid technology began in 1997: Prisma was launched, the world’s first completely digital hearing aid with two microphones, which automatically adjusted to the current hearing situation.

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1966: Siretta. A custom fit inside the ear.

The Siretta 339 was the first hearing aid from Siemens to be worn entirely inside the ear. This in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aid system was made possible by a micro-amplifier designed specifically for it.

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1959: Auriculette. From a vest pocket to behind the ear.

Like its predecessors, the 1959 Siemens Auriculette 326 consisted of a microphone, amplifier, and earphone, with a battery as a power supply. In the Auriculette, however, the components were so small and lightweight that they fit together in a single housing worn comfortably behind the ear.

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1954: Phonophor Epsilon. Lighter than a tennis ball, as small as a matchbox

The Phonophor Epsilon weighed only about 50 grams (less than two ounces), including the batteries, and was the size of a matchbox. This was made possible by a discovery that had been made just a short time before, and one that has gone on to become a fixture of our everyday lives today: transistor technology.

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Hear easily - even with single-sided deafness

Thanks to wireless Signia CROS/BiCROS solutions, people with an un-aidable hearing loss in one ear can now hear and understand clearly and with less strain at all times.

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1951: Phonophor Alpha. The power of electrons – right in your vest pocket

It was not until World War II and the postwar period that subminiature tubes were developed, allowing for lightweight, compact hearing aids that encapsulated the benefits of the new technology in a form small enough to fit in a vest pocket.

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1928: Phonophor with microphone amplifier. Lighter and more compact.

After the huge success of the first Phonophor models, Siemens & Halske expanded hearing aid production activities at Berlin’s Wernerwerk plant. New materials and designs made the Phonophor lighter and more compact, while advances in technology improved performance and sound quality.

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Easy listening even in reverberant rooms

Besides noisy public places, locations with reverberation make it harder to understand speech. The EchoShield function in Signia hearing aids reduces these negative effects in environments in which you need to pay particular attention to what is being heard.

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1913: Louis Weber and the Phonophor

Originally planned as a single hearing aid for a friend of the company, the device turned out to be a huge success, and series production was launched in December 1913 – marking the start of the long and successful history of our hearing aids.

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